Hi, I'm Colin.

Dec 24

Planning a fresh start for the new year. Stay tuned.

Dec 04

Minnesota Log Marks

The marks were a means of identification—a symbol of ownership. When a mark was sold or transferred to someone else, the transfer was reported to the surveyor general’s office and recorded. Still on the statute books are laws which make it a misdemeanor to take logs from rivers, sloughs, islands, or land adjoining rivers; to cut out, multilate, destroy, or render illegible the marks on logs; to injure logs belonging to others; to place on “any log or piece of timber, any mark except the original” one; or to “purchase, receive, or secrete saw logs” unlawfully taken from streams.

Minnesota Log Marks

The marks were a means of identification—a symbol of ownership. When a mark was sold or transferred to someone else, the transfer was reported to the surveyor general’s office and recorded. Still on the statute books are laws which make it a misdemeanor to take logs from rivers, sloughs, islands, or land adjoining rivers; to cut out, multilate, destroy, or render illegible the marks on logs; to injure logs belonging to others; to place on “any log or piece of timber, any mark except the original” one; or to “purchase, receive, or secrete saw logs” unlawfully taken from streams.

Jun 11

weworkhere:

Read Ippississim.

weworkhere:

Read Ippississim.

Apr 08

[video]

Feb 18

weworkhere:

Join us for our Give & Take event this Thursday February 21st @ 7:00 PM at the University Enterprise Laboratories in Saint Paul! Free and open to the public!
Here is the link to the event on Facebook
Link to Give & Take event

weworkhere:

Join us for our Give & Take event this Thursday February 21st @ 7:00 PM at the University Enterprise Laboratories in Saint Paul! Free and open to the public!

Here is the link to the event on Facebook

Link to Give & Take event

(via shardlow)

Feb 02

What’s up y’all.

What’s up y’all.

Jan 23

[video]

#MNIdeas 04:

thirtytwomag:

image

Loving that Thirty Two is on Tumblr. We wrote this one.

Jan 04

[video]

Dec 18

[video]

Nov 07

Reviving my blog just for this.

Reviving my blog just for this.

(Source: chuckolsen, via iteeth)

Sep 24

weareherefornow:

littlebrownmushroom:

Alec Soth. Tucson, Arizona. 2011. 


I’m going country tomorrow night at Salon Saloon. Details here



wish i could be there!

So excited!

weareherefornow:

littlebrownmushroom:

Alec Soth. Tucson, Arizona. 2011. 

I’m going country tomorrow night at Salon Saloon. Details here

wish i could be there!

So excited!

Jul 13

weworkhere:

Join Us for a New Series of Art-Science Adventures on the Mississippi River this July & August!

Join our motley crew of Artists, Scientists, Park Rangers and River Rats for a cruise aboard the freewheeling Padelford Riverboat as it makes its way down the Mississippi River.

We’ve got three unique River City Revue excursions planned for July and August, all departing from the Padelford Riverboat dock on Harriet Island in Saint Paul at 7PM.

Tickets are $10 and can be purchased in advance through the Mississippi River Fund.

Expect a 2-hour boat adventure featuring live music, short science talks, art presentations, hands-on art making, and plenty of river stories! Each River City Revue will animate a different theme and present eclectic perspectives in an effort to focus attention on the magnificent Mississippi River and the National Park in our own backyard.

DRINKING THE RIVER | July 18th
On this inaugural excursion of the River City Revue, we will survey the inseparable relationship between people and the river: Sustenance. Inebriation. Consumption. Waste. Cleansing. Come and drink the river with us! Musical guests: The Southside Aces. Click here to see the full program and order tickets for DRINKING THE RIVER.

WICKED RIVER | August 1st
A historic naval disaster, catastrophic floods, crushing ice-floes and shantyboat shenanigans—the Mighty Mississippi has a reputation for danger. Revel in the river’s dark side through storytelling, science and song. Musical guests: Prairie Fire Lady Choir. Click here to see the full program and order tickets for DRINKING THE RIVER.

THE RIVER IMAGINED | August 15th
The Mississippi has long inspired artists, from the writings of Mark Twain to the sounds of the Delta blues. Imagine the river with a cadre of makers and researchers who might lead you to see something new in these everyday waters. Musical guest: Sneaky Pete Bauer. Click here to see the full program and order tickets for DRINKING THE RIVER.

River City Revue is presented by the Mississippi River Fund, Works Progress, The National Park Service, and Padelford Riverboats. Poster by the artists at LandLand. Get your copy on the boat!

weworkhere:

Join Us for a New Series of Art-Science Adventures on the Mississippi River this July & August!

Join our motley crew of Artists, Scientists, Park Rangers and River Rats for a cruise aboard the freewheeling Padelford Riverboat as it makes its way down the Mississippi River.

We’ve got three unique River City Revue excursions planned for July and August, all departing from the Padelford Riverboat dock on Harriet Island in Saint Paul at 7PM.

Tickets are $10 and can be purchased in advance through the Mississippi River Fund.

Expect a 2-hour boat adventure featuring live music, short science talks, art presentations, hands-on art making, and plenty of river stories! Each River City Revue will animate a different theme and present eclectic perspectives in an effort to focus attention on the magnificent Mississippi River and the National Park in our own backyard.

DRINKING THE RIVER | July 18th
On this inaugural excursion of the River City Revue, we will survey the inseparable relationship between people and the river: Sustenance. Inebriation. Consumption. Waste. Cleansing. Come and drink the river with us! Musical guests: The Southside Aces. Click here to see the full program and order tickets for DRINKING THE RIVER.

WICKED RIVER | August 1st
A historic naval disaster, catastrophic floods, crushing ice-floes and shantyboat shenanigans—the Mighty Mississippi has a reputation for danger. Revel in the river’s dark side through storytelling, science and song. Musical guests: Prairie Fire Lady Choir. Click here to see the full program and order tickets for DRINKING THE RIVER.

THE RIVER IMAGINED | August 15th
The Mississippi has long inspired artists, from the writings of Mark Twain to the sounds of the Delta blues. Imagine the river with a cadre of makers and researchers who might lead you to see something new in these everyday waters. Musical guest: Sneaky Pete Bauer. Click here to see the full program and order tickets for DRINKING THE RIVER.

River City Revue is presented by the Mississippi River Fund, Works Progress, The National Park Service, and Padelford Riverboats. Poster by the artists at LandLand. Get your copy on the boat!

jayrosen:

If Mitt Romney were running a “post-truth” campaign, would the political press even report it?
Link: Boston Globe, Mitt Romney stayed at Bain 3 years longer than he stated.  ”Firm’s 2002 filings identify him as CEO, though he said he left in 1999.” (Fallout.)
Suppose a major party candidate for president believed we were in a “post-truth” era and actually campaigned that way: Would political reporters in the mainstream press figure it out and tell us?
I say no. They would not tell us. Instead, they would do what the Globe did here: try to nail the candidate on specific misstatements that can be documented. Which is good and necessary and difficult and contentious and honorable. So go, Boston Globe! And don’t forget to credit others who have done similar work.
But what of a strategy that incorporates…
1.) The lessons of the climate change debate, which is that you can run a political campaign against verifiable facts, and thereby weaken those facts in the public’s mind?
2.) The Palin method, which is that you can invent stuff and stick to it when it is shown to be false because culture war politics feeds off the noise and friction when fictional claims are fact-checked by the mainstream media?
3.) David Frum’s observation: “Backed by their own wing of the book-publishing industry and supported by think tanks that increasingly function as public-relations agencies, conservatives have built a whole alternative knowledge system, with its own facts, its own history, its own laws of economics.”
4. Plain old-fashioned secrecy, as in: don’t release information, don’t explain.
I think there’s ample evidence that the Romney forces have figured much of this out. And so even though we have a political press that believes itself to be a savvy judge of campaign strategy, here is one strategy that will go unnamed and un-described because (and this may be the cleverest part of the strategy!…) a post-truth campaign for president falls into the category of too big to tell.
Meaning: It feels too partisan. It exposes the press to too much criticism. It messes with the “both sides do it” narrative that political journalists have mastered: and deeply believe in. And so Romney will be fact checked, his campaign will push back from time to time, the fact checkers will argue among themselves, and the post-truth premise will sneak into common practice without penalty or recognition, even though there is nothing covert about it.
(Image by fimoculous. Creative commons license.)

jayrosen:

If Mitt Romney were running a “post-truth” campaign, would the political press even report it?

Link: Boston Globe, Mitt Romney stayed at Bain 3 years longer than he stated.  ”Firm’s 2002 filings identify him as CEO, though he said he left in 1999.” (Fallout.)

Suppose a major party candidate for president believed we were in a “post-truth” era and actually campaigned that way: Would political reporters in the mainstream press figure it out and tell us?

I say no. They would not tell us. Instead, they would do what the Globe did here: try to nail the candidate on specific misstatements that can be documented. Which is good and necessary and difficult and contentious and honorable. So go, Boston Globe! And don’t forget to credit others who have done similar work.

But what of a strategy that incorporates…

1.) The lessons of the climate change debate, which is that you can run a political campaign against verifiable facts, and thereby weaken those facts in the public’s mind?

2.) The Palin method, which is that you can invent stuff and stick to it when it is shown to be false because culture war politics feeds off the noise and friction when fictional claims are fact-checked by the mainstream media?

3.) David Frum’s observation: “Backed by their own wing of the book-publishing industry and supported by think tanks that increasingly function as public-relations agencies, conservatives have built a whole alternative knowledge system, with its own facts, its own history, its own laws of economics.”

4. Plain old-fashioned secrecy, as in: don’t release information, don’t explain.

I think there’s ample evidence that the Romney forces have figured much of this out. And so even though we have a political press that believes itself to be a savvy judge of campaign strategy, here is one strategy that will go unnamed and un-described because (and this may be the cleverest part of the strategy!…) a post-truth campaign for president falls into the category of too big to tell.

Meaning: It feels too partisan. It exposes the press to too much criticism. It messes with the “both sides do it” narrative that political journalists have mastered: and deeply believe in. And so Romney will be fact checked, his campaign will push back from time to time, the fact checkers will argue among themselves, and the post-truth premise will sneak into common practice without penalty or recognition, even though there is nothing covert about it.

(Image by fimoculous. Creative commons license.)

Jul 02

[video]